One of my Facebook friends, Casey, posted two questions yesterday: what do you miss most from the previous "normal"? and what do you love most about the current "normal"? There were some great answers.

WHAT IS MISSED

In no particular order, the items that are missed the most seem to include

  • friends/socializing
  • nightlife/socializing
  • solitude (away from family)
  • the gym
  • not having to worry when out-and-about
  • having a schedule
  • getting hair/nails done

I miss seeing my coworkers and I miss laughing as much as I used to, and I am certain that the two are related. It seemed like there was always a laugh in our building.

WHAT IS LOVED

Again, in no particular order, here are some things that people love about the new normal

  • not having to set an alarm
  • less traffic
  • spending time with close family
  • working from home
  • not being as rushed
  • the fact that the earth is feeling better
  • the realization that too many of us center our lives around our jobs
John Falcon

The post made me reflect on the things I miss from the previous normal, and it made me realize that I am either A) a simple person, or B) not very good at reflecting because my list is short.

WHAT I MISS

  • seeing my friends
  • hugs
  • travel
  • a good economy

Or maybe it's because I try to concentrate on the positives. After all, my list of "loves" is a bit longer.

WHAT I LOVE

  • working from home. Instead of walking to the refrigerator or the snack or coffee machine during my breaks at the office, I can walk to the laundry room and swap around a batch of clothes. I can sweep and dust and straighten - the house hasn't looked this good in a long time. I can start a meal during a break so I can eat supper at a decent time (I've lost 3 pounds so far, and I am certain it's because I'm eating earlier at night).
  • I'm driving less, which means that I can save some $ on fuel/upkeep.
  • I'm realizing I'm more like my parents than I thought: I now have a garden (my dad loved his garden) and I have been making preserves (I can't yet get them to taste like my mom's).
  • being frugal. Since I am limiting my exposure, my trips to the grocery are fewer, so I am forced to be mindful and try to use everything (I still can't find a use for the squeal, though).
  • seeing families outside. I have never seen so many families taking walks or riding bikes in the neighborhood as I have seen over the past few weeks.
  • less screen time. Each week my iPhone gives me a report on how much time I spent on my smartphone, and it has been on a downward trend for the 3rd week in a row.
  • cleaner air. Many major cities are reporting an increase in air quality due to fewer emissions. I like clean air.

The coronavirus pandemic is taking quite a toll on the American public. Aside from the health toll (physically and mentally), the economic toll has many wondering where their next meal will come or if they will still have a job in a week as new unemployment claims near 17 million. Many have already lost jobs locally, including a huge number of people in the service industry.

If you have friends or family members who have been adversely affected by the pandemic, remember to reach out and lend a hand.