In 1970 the average person was exposed to 500 - 1600 advertisements per day. According to a 2007 survey by the marketing research firm Yankelovich, the jump in the number of ads an individual is exposed to on a daily basis just a few decades later is dramatic. In the 2007 survey, every person in modern times sees or hears an estimated 5000 advertisements per day. And after polling over 4000 people, the majority in the survey thought advertising techniques were out of control.

In 2020, the number of ads an individual is exposed to on a daily basis is likely even higher than it was in 2007. Ads on billboards, popups on your computer and smartphone, television, radio, magazines, newspapers, park benches, etc. are all aimed at getting your attention hoping to strike an emotional spark within you that motivates you to open your wallet.

In a bold move by Frito-Lay, the company's latest 30-second Doritos ad never shows or mentions the logo. The word "Doritos" is never used. The premise is that Doritos is such a well-known brand and logo, the television ad can sell the product without the logo or naming the product.

Frito-Lay's new marketing scheme is a new way to get your attention and to make your mouth water for Doritos. Does it?